Mission Issues

Thinking and re-thinking missionary issues

The Second Chance

While at a missions meeting last week, a friend of mine told me about a DVD with the name, The Second Chance. I was able to get a copy of the DVD and our family watched it on Saturday. The story is about a pastor, Ethan Jenkins (played by Michael W Smith), the minister of music at a suburban mega-church called The Rock, and Jake Sanders, a pastor of an urban church called Second Chance. He has a nice church and his salary is sponsored by The Rock. Once a year pastor Sanders is invited to The Rock to give a three minute talk on how things are going at Second Chance (and to thank the people of The Rock for their help!) On one such a morning, he tells the people of The Rock that they should keep their money if they were not willing to become personally involved in his ministry amongst drug addicts, prostitutes, juvenile delinquents, dysfunctional families and worse. Obviously the people from The Rock are greatly upset by these words and pastor Jenkins, who had invited him to speak, was blamed because he was not able to restrict pastor Sanders to the prescribed three minutes nor did he coach him properly on what to say. And so pastor Jenkins is seconded to Second Chance to teach him a lesson.

Towards the end of the movie the leadership of The Rock meet with local developers who want to build some stadium in the area, but in order to do that, Second Chance church will have to be demolished and the church will have to be relocated about five miles away. And this was the part of the movie that really touched me personally, as I saw the leadership of The Rock making decisions without consulting the leadership of Second Chance, planning a wonderful new campus for Second Chance and after everything had been finalised, only then calling in the people of Second Chance and informing them of the plans.

What was clearly shown in this part of the movie is how often people in the church (those with the money) can make decisions on behalf of those with less money. Very often the decisions in itself are not bad. Usually the decisions are for the good of others. But because the decisions had been taken without consulting those mostly affected by the decisions, huge mistrust and accusations are bred between the two groups and in the end, instead of working together, they work against each other. And I couldn’t help wondering how often I may have done the same thing – with good intentions – but still, breaking down relationships instead of building them.

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Monday, June 16, 2008 - Posted by | Building relations, Church, Cross-cultural experiences, Dependency, Giving, Meetings, Mission, Partnership, Racism, Sustainability, Theology, Tithing

5 Comments »

  1. I thought that was a very good movie as well. Thanks

    Comment by Daniel | Monday, June 16, 2008 | Reply

  2. How are the pastors now being paid?

    From love offerings or the tithe?

    People who accept any portion of the tithe are not allowed to own any tangible property, such as a home, real estate.. according to the Bible too

    http://anyonecare.wordpress.com/2008/05/29/the-ttihe/

    Comment by thenonconformer | Monday, August 4, 2008 | Reply

  3. In most churches it is impossible to distinguish between love offerings and tithes.

    Comment by Arnau van Wyngaard | Tuesday, August 5, 2008 | Reply

  4. I’ve not seen the movie to which you refer , however, I do read the book where Tithing and Free will giving is discussed. The new covenant ushered in a change in the law..giving is an issue of free will, not by compulsion. If , however, Levi is your priest, then by all means, tithe..but do so knowing that one who is under the law is under a curse.
    Greg

    Comment by Greg | Monday, January 5, 2009 | Reply

  5. Yes, you’re right. The New Testament actually asks much more from us than merely tithing. Jesus set us free from from having our money and other belongings as our god, so that we can use them to bless others.

    Comment by Arnau van Wyngaard | Monday, January 5, 2009 | Reply


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