Mission Issues

Thinking and re-thinking missionary issues

Returning home after a mission trip

I’ve been following some of the news of the team members who had recently had their short-term outreach to Swaziland from Florida, USA. Most of them are on Facebook. Personally I’m not very fond of Facebook but I must admit that it does give me the opportunity to have closer contact with this team as a whole. But more than anything else I think, I’m intrigued to see how these students adapt to their “normal” lives after their visit to Swaziland.
On their arrival back in the states, they immediately set up a group on Facebook where they could post their photos and video clips and send messages to each other. The first messages were: “I feel so lost without seeing you guys today!!!!” and “I miss you all & Love you all so much!! Hope your summers are swell! Keep in touch, and POST PICTURES! Love you all!” Then the posts concentrated on asking the team members to post their video clips. But now, two weeks later, there is hardly any mention anymore about their trip to Swaziland.
Looking at the individuals’ profiles, it is clear, after two weeks of leaving Swaziland, that life is “back to normal” for most of them, with only one or two still mentioning constantly that they wish they could be back in Swaziland. Oh, and it was interesting to see, just after their return from Swaziland, that all of them had changed their profile photos to one taken in Swaziland. A few have already changed their photos again showing something which they had done during the past few days.
OK, two questions: If I had told the group, just before they left Swaziland that for most of them Swaziland will be a far-off memory in a few weeks time, would they have believed me? Probably not. Is this abnormal? Probably not. I think different people react differently to short-term outreaches. I myself get much more emotionally attached to people than many of my friends. For the past eight years I’ve been going to Samara in Russia for two weeks. For the first week or two after my return, I really struggle to focus on my normal duties. All I can think of is my visit to Russia. I’m not a great tennis fan, but after returning from Russia my wife (she loves tennis) calls me to come and watch each time that Maria Sharapova plays, not because she’s blonde or beautiful or an excellent tennis player, but because she’s Russian! My wife has been to Russia with me, so she understands my withdrawal symptoms after arriving back at home.
How do I handle my return from a short-term missionary outreach? First of all I believe that God had sent me on that trip for a purpose and the purpose is not primarily so that I could enjoy myself. God wanted to teach me something and He wants me to share what I have learnt with other people. And so I try and arrange a time, usually in church on a Sunday, to give a short presentation on what I had experienced. Then I put up reminders (photos or some other gift I may have received) to help me to remember to pray for these people. You can pray for people you do not know. But it becomes much easier and more enjoyable to pray for people whom you do know and whose circumstances, home, family, etc you are familiar with.
But for myself the greatest help is my commitment to the people in Samara. The first year I prayed whether I should go. The second year I prayed that I would be able to go. From then on I prayed that God should show me if He didn’t want me to go! This keeps me focussed on the country and the people I’ve come to know. They know that I’ve made a long-term investment in them and I believe they do appreciate it.
When you arrive in the foreign country, you go through varying degrees of culture shock. When you return home the same thing happens. We have to learn how to handle these emotions and how to apply it in a positive way so that the people that we had visited will benefit from it.

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Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - Posted by | Building relations, Comfort Zone, Cross-cultural experiences, Culture Shock, Mission, Prayer, Russia, Short-term outreaches, Support teams, Sustainability, Swaziland, Theology

2 Comments »

  1. This has been incredibly helpful since just returning from Cambodia for a 2nd time. And this…

    “The first year I prayed whether I should go. The second year I prayed that I would be able to go. From then on I prayed that God should show me if He didn’t want me to go!”

    …hit the nail right on the head! I had to laugh. And it was nice to laugh after being so heart-broken for 3 days. It was very hard to leave these orphaned children I had connected with. After reading your post, I created a folder of the children’s faces and will pray for them as well as write to stay connected. I’m considering how God might want me to use what I’ve learned as well. Leaving and returning to home-life in the U.S. was very, very hard this time. I truly appreciate your sharing this.

    For the Kingdom,
    Christie

    Comment by Christie | Thursday, September 16, 2010 | Reply

  2. Indeed God has made a commitment to us. It is right that we share and make a commitment to His people everywhere including the mission field and back at home.
    This is part of the struggle of returning home. It is easy to share God’s love in other places where we are not hindered by our culture or what people may think. But the God of creation is the same God in the mission field as He is at home. Remain faithful in everything and everywhere and this will help in returning home.

    Comment by Bruce | Saturday, April 27, 2013 | Reply


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